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What is transcolation ?

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What is transcolation ?
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Riya☺ Pal 2 months ago

It is translocation not transcolation

Riya☺ Pal 2 months ago

Translocation is the movement of dissolved substances, such as sucrose and amino acids, from parts of the plant where the substances are made to other parts of the plant where they’re needed. Translocation takes place in the phloem - transport vessels made up of two types of cell, sieve tube elements and companion cells. The parts of the plant which make these substances are referred to as sources (e.g. the leaves) and the parts of the plant which store or use the substances are called sinks (examples include bulbs and roots). When sucrose reaches a sink, it is converted into starch for carbohydrate storage. This maintains a concentration gradient between the source and the sink, so that more sucrose moves into the source. Translocation is an active process, so if respiration is reduced or inhibited (e.g. using a respiratory toxin), translocation will be impaired. The Mass Flow Hypothesis The mass flow hypothesis is a theory which attempts to explain how solutes are transported from source cells into sinks through the phloem. It isn’t concrete, but it is the best-accepted theory we currently have based on the available evidence. It states that mass flow of solutes takes place in the phloem in the following stages: Sucrose moves from companion cells into sieve tube elements by active transport. This reduces the water potential of the sieve tube element. Water moves into the phloem by osmosis, which increases the hydrostatic pressure. There is a pressure gradient with high hydrostatic pressure near the source cell and lower hydrostatic pressure near the sink cells. Solutes move down the pressure gradient towards the sink end of the phloem. Solutes move into sink cells and are converted into other molecules (e.g. starch). The removal of solutes increases the water potential at the sink end, causing water to move out of the phloem by osmosis. This maintains the hydrostatic pressure gradient between the source and the sink
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