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  • 2 answers

Bitu Kumar 3 weeks, 1 day ago

300

Rekha Kumari 3 weeks, 2 days ago

300
  • 1 answers

Aaaa Aam 1 month, 3 weeks ago

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  • 4 answers

Rekha Kumari 3 weeks, 2 days ago

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Garima ❤️ 2 months, 1 week ago

Hey s ........ Are you a boy or girl ??

Komal Kumari 2 months, 2 weeks ago

Hello

Sanket .........✨ 2 months, 2 weeks ago

Hii ....?
  • 5 answers

Devapriya K 1 month, 3 weeks ago

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Garima ❤️ 2 months, 1 week ago

Hlo

Garima ❤️ 2 months, 2 weeks ago

Hi

Kumkum Koshta 2 months, 2 weeks ago

Hello

Priyanshu Mourya 2 months, 3 weeks ago

Hlo
  • 1 answers

Srinu Srinu 4 months, 1 week ago

The entrie kingdom was actually controlled and administered by the commanders of these armies.
  • 3 answers

Garima ❤️ 2 months, 1 week ago

Agar koi nhi chalata toh ?? Aap kahin available hai kya ??

Riya Raikwar 4 months, 1 week ago

Who

Sanket .........✨ 4 months, 2 weeks ago

Sanket_ff_444 ye le
  • 5 answers

Pilot Aarti 4 months, 3 weeks ago

Hlo

Piyush ❤️ 4 months, 3 weeks ago

Okk koii nhii hota hoga kabhii kabhii ab nhii hoga

Diksha Laniya? 4 months, 3 weeks ago

Nahi ma nahi buli kyo ke muja cbse guide na nikal diya tha

Piyush ❤️ 4 months, 3 weeks ago

Hii diksha ap to bhul he gyi bilkul ?

Diksha Laniya? 4 months, 3 weeks ago

Hello
  • 4 answers

Rekha Kumari 3 weeks, 2 days ago

9

Priyanshu Mourya 2 months, 3 weeks ago

Yes bhai

Parth Gupta 4 months, 3 weeks ago

24

Kuldeep Kasaudhan 4 months, 3 weeks ago

9
  • 2 answers

Pilot Aarti 4 months, 3 weeks ago

Cotton is a soft, fluffy staple fiber that grows in a boll, or protective case, around the seeds of the cotton plants of the genus Gossypium in the mallow family Malvaceae. The fiber is almost pure cellulose, and can contain minor percentages of waxes, fats, pectins, and water. Under natural conditions, the cotton bolls will increase the dispersal of the seeds. Manually decontaminating cotton before processing at an Indian spinning mill (2010) The plant is a shrub native to tropical and subtropical regions around the world, including the Americas, Africa, Egypt and India. The greatest diversity of wild cotton species is found in Mexico, followed by Australia and Africa.[1] Cotton was independently domesticated in the Old and New Worlds. The fiber is most often spun into yarn or thread and used to make a soft, breathable, and durable textile. The use of cotton for fabric is known to date to prehistoric times; fragments of cotton fabric dated to the fifth millennium BC have been found in the Indus Valley Civilization, as well as fabric remnants dated back to 6000 BC in Peru. Although cultivated since antiquity, it was the invention of the cotton gin that lowered the cost of production that led to its widespread use, and it is the most widely used natural fiber cloth in clothing today. Current estimates for world production are about 25 million tonnes or 110 million bales annually, accounting for 2.5% of the world's arable land. India is the world's largest producer of cotton. The United States has been the largest exporter for many years.

Vipul Singh Rao 5 months, 1 week ago

Okk
  • 2 answers
Same to u ??

Piyush ❤️ 6 months, 1 week ago

Same to u ?✨
  • 0 answers
  • 5 answers

Ayush Kesharwani 4 days, 7 hours ago

Shortest Path coverd by an object from final to initial

Shubham Singh 7 months ago

Thanks

Deepanshu Kaninwal 7 months, 1 week ago

Shortest path travelled by a object b/w two points

Ilesh Yadav 7 months, 3 weeks ago

Distance travelled by an object from its initial position to the final position

Liku Moni 7 months, 3 weeks ago

The shortest distance covered from initial position to final position by an object is displacement.
Hi
  • 5 answers

Harsh Saraswat 3 weeks ago

This content has been hidden. One or more users have flagged this content as inappropriate. Once content is flagged, it is hidden from users and is reviewed by myCBSEguide team against our Community Guidelines. If content is found in violation, the user posting this content will be banned for 30 days from using Homework help section. Suspended users will receive error while adding question or answer. Question comments have also been disabled. Read community guidelines at https://mycbseguide.com/community-guidelines.html

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Remember the goal of this website is to share knowledge and learn from each other. Ask questions and help others by answering questions.

Garima ❤️ 2 months, 1 week ago

Hlo

Roly Keshao Nagose 7 months, 4 weeks ago

Hello???

Amir Khan Khan 8 months ago

??

Amir Khan Khan 8 months ago

Hello ?
  • 1 answers

Manisha Raikwar 7 months, 3 weeks ago

Cooking
  • 4 answers

Deepanshu Kaninwal 7 months, 1 week ago

Take dung and take it in a container for one month for composting

Pankaj Pilania 9 months ago

Compost - Compost is simply decayed organic matter like food scraps, clothing, paper, and some personal care products. It’s a great way to improve garden soil and provide nutrients for plants, and it might be all you need to fertilise your garden. Here are two posts about my composting methods, the first is how I compost at my new home, the second is how I composted at our previous home. Aquarium water - Aquarium water is filled with nutrients (nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, ammonia) and micro-organisms from fish waste that plants can use. Our fish tank is filled with rainwater and only has two fish, so the nutrients are diluted enough to go straight on my plants or soil. This is a great option for watering indoor pot plants. You won’t be able to use your aquarium water if you have a salt-water tank because the amount of salt may harm the plants. Also, if you’ve added any chemicals to the water, it’s advised not to apply the water to plants being grown for consumption. Cooking water - Nutrients are released from food when it is cooked in water; this applies to all sorts of food including eggs, vegetables and pasta. Make sure you cool it before using as a fertiliser. Alternatively, you can do what I sometimes do, which is to pour the boiling hot water on weeds. The hot water will kill them and the nutrients will be available for other plants nearby. Egg shells - We get about 7 eggs a day from our chickens so the egg shells quickly accumulate. Eggshells are about 95% calcium carbonate which is the same ingredient as lime, a popular soil amendment used to reduce soil acidity and improve fertility. You can make a slow release calcium fertiliser simply by rinsing out the egg shells with water and drying them on a window sill to stop them growing mould. Once dry, grind the egg shells up in a blender or with a mortar and pestle. Store in a glass jar. Wood ash - Wood ash straight from your fireplace, fire pit or wood fired oven is a good source of calcium (good for root growth), potassium  (improves disease resistance and flower, seed and fruit quality) and magnesium (important in photosynthesis), as well as other trace elements. However, the key elements nitrogen and sulphur are lost as gases during burning so it’s not a complete fertiliser. Being 25% – 45% calcium carbonate, wood ash can be used instead of lime to reduce the acidity of the soil, so make sure you don’t use it around acid loving plants. Most vegetables like to be in the neutral pH zone so wood ash can help if your soils are slightly acidic which is most soils in Australia. You can also sprinkle wood ash in your compost from time to time as compost tends to be slightly acidic. Managing the pH levels of soils helps make nutrients available to plants. The presence of potassium (5% – 7%) makes it ideal for top dressing fruiting plants and sprinkling throughout the vegetable garden when preparing beds. If you are going to use wood ash, make sure you are only burning hard wood (best) or soft wood because treated pine, briquettes with chemicals added, and lighter fluid are not good for you or your plants. Rabbit manure - My kids were given two rabbits to care for (one is a rescued rabbit) so we need to deal with their waste. Rabbit manure is rich in nitrogen and phosphorus and contains more nutrients than cow, horse and chicken manure, but it is a cold manure because the rabbit’s herbivorous diet means it contains an ideal ratio of nitrogen to carbon. This means it can be added directly to garden beds without it burning the plants. You can add the manure by top dressing or by work it through the top soil. Rabbit manure is great because the little bunny berries are dry, easy to handle, and odourless. They break down quickly and can be applied any time of the year, and of course you can add it to your compost too. This Winter I have prepared my garden beds by working the rabbit manure and hay bedding through the soil. The bedding will contain rabbit urine which is high in ammonia, so letting that sit for a week to allow the ammonia to evaporate will stop plants from being burnt. Chicken manure - Our chickens are free range but they still do 50% of their pooping while roosting at night in the hen house, so this needs to be regularly cleaned out. Chicken manure is considered ‘hot’ because it is high in nitrogen. It will burn plants if it is not aged or composted before being applied to the soil. As I use the dig and drop composting method and I want to avoid double handling, I age the straw and manure from the hen house on the garden bed I wish to plant in later on. After aging, I dig it through more thoroughly and continue with planting. Weed tea - Making weed tea is a great way to deal with difficult weeds that you don’t want to put in your compost (so that they aren’t accidently spread around your garden). By making weed tea, you kill the weeds by drowning them in water and recycle the nutrients that have seeped out of the weeds back into the garden. At the end of a day of weeding I stuff a bucket full of weeds, then submerge them completely in rainwater. If you only have access to mains water, it might be best to allow it to stand for 24 hours to allow the chlorine to disappear. The removal of chlorine makes it easier for microorganisms to multiply. Finally, I pop a lid on and leave the bucket in the garden shed. After six weeks of fermenting, the weeds are completely dead and can be strained out of the solution. Beware, this stuff smells vile and will stick around for a day if you get it on you. The dead weeds can now be safely added to your compost to continue breaking down. Use the liquid, which will be rich in nutrients and beneficial microorganisms such as bacteria, fungi, protozoa and nematodes, as a fertiliser by mixing one litre with five litres of water. Liquid fertilizer in the form of a “tea” is thought to give plants, especially vegetables and fruit trees, a boost that is quicker than applying the manure, worm castings or compost. Although it’s not waste, if you live by the beach, a locally abundant resource for you to create a liquid fertiliser could be seaweed washed up on the shore. But, you must ensure you know the laws about collecting seaweed from beaches in your area. To make the fertiliser, use it in place of or in addition to weeds. As well as calcium, seaweed contains mannitol which is a compound that increases a plant’s ability to absorb nutrients in the soil. Manure / compost tea or extract - Liquid fertilisers can be made by soaking any nutrient rich material like compost or manure in water. Often these are called ‘teas’, which they are if they have been brewed for a long time like the weed tea above. But according to Sustainable Gardening Australia an extract is a much quicker way of making a nutrient rich fertiliser but without the same level of microorganisms.  To make an extract, simply put a shovel full of manure or compost in a 20 litre bucket, mix and leave for a few hours to 3 days. Strain off the liquid and use as fertiliser.

Madhbendra Op Singh 9 months, 2 weeks ago

Noob

Sia ? 10 months ago

  1. Compost - Compost is simply decayed organic matter like food scraps, clothing, paper, and some personal care products. It’s a great way to improve garden soil and provide nutrients for plants, and it might be all you need to fertilise your garden. Here are two posts about my composting methods, the first is how I compost at my new home, the second is how I composted at our previous home.
  2. Aquarium water - Aquarium water is filled with nutrients (nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, ammonia) and micro-organisms from fish waste that plants can use. Our fish tank is filled with rainwater and only has two fish, so the nutrients are diluted enough to go straight on my plants or soil. This is a great option for watering indoor pot plants.
    You won’t be able to use your aquarium water if you have a salt-water tank because the amount of salt may harm the plants. Also, if you’ve added any chemicals to the water, it’s advised not to apply the water to plants being grown for consumption.
  3. Cooking water - Nutrients are released from food when it is cooked in water; this applies to all sorts of food including eggs, vegetables and pasta. Make sure you cool it before using as a fertiliser. Alternatively, you can do what I sometimes do, which is to pour the boiling hot water on weeds. The hot water will kill them and the nutrients will be available for other plants nearby.
  4. Egg shells - We get about 7 eggs a day from our chickens so the egg shells quickly accumulate. Eggshells are about 95% calcium carbonate which is the same ingredient as lime, a popular soil amendment used to reduce soil acidity and improve fertility.
    You can make a slow release calcium fertiliser simply by rinsing out the egg shells with water and drying them on a window sill to stop them growing mould. Once dry, grind the egg shells up in a blender or with a mortar and pestle. Store in a glass jar.
  5. Wood ash - Wood ash straight from your fireplace, fire pit or wood fired oven is a good source of calcium (good for root growth), potassium  (improves disease resistance and flower, seed and fruit quality) and magnesium (important in photosynthesis), as well as other trace elements. However, the key elements nitrogen and sulphur are lost as gases during burning so it’s not a complete fertiliser.
    Being 25% – 45% calcium carbonate, wood ash can be used instead of lime to reduce the acidity of the soil, so make sure you don’t use it around acid loving plants. Most vegetables like to be in the neutral pH zone so wood ash can help if your soils are slightly acidic which is most soils in Australia. You can also sprinkle wood ash in your compost from time to time as compost tends to be slightly acidic. Managing the pH levels of soils helps make nutrients available to plants.
    The presence of potassium (5% – 7%) makes it ideal for top dressing fruiting plants and sprinkling throughout the vegetable garden when preparing beds.
    If you are going to use wood ash, make sure you are only burning hard wood (best) or soft wood because treated pine, briquettes with chemicals added, and lighter fluid are not good for you or your plants.
  6. Rabbit manure - My kids were given two rabbits to care for (one is a rescued rabbit) so we need to deal with their waste. Rabbit manure is rich in nitrogen and phosphorus and contains more nutrients than cow, horse and chicken manure, but it is a cold manure because the rabbit’s herbivorous diet means it contains an ideal ratio of nitrogen to carbon. This means it can be added directly to garden beds without it burning the plants. You can add the manure by top dressing or by work it through the top soil. Rabbit manure is great because the little bunny berries are dry, easy to handle, and odourless. They break down quickly and can be applied any time of the year, and of course you can add it to your compost too.
    This Winter I have prepared my garden beds by working the rabbit manure and hay bedding through the soil. The bedding will contain rabbit urine which is high in ammonia, so letting that sit for a week to allow the ammonia to evaporate will stop plants from being burnt.
  7. Chicken manure - Our chickens are free range but they still do 50% of their pooping while roosting at night in the hen house, so this needs to be regularly cleaned out. Chicken manure is considered ‘hot’ because it is high in nitrogen. It will burn plants if it is not aged or composted before being applied to the soil. As I use the dig and drop composting method and I want to avoid double handling, I age the straw and manure from the hen house on the garden bed I wish to plant in later on. After aging, I dig it through more thoroughly and continue with planting.
  8. Weed tea - Making weed tea is a great way to deal with difficult weeds that you don’t want to put in your compost (so that they aren’t accidently spread around your garden). By making weed tea, you kill the weeds by drowning them in water and recycle the nutrients that have seeped out of the weeds back into the garden.
    At the end of a day of weeding I stuff a bucket full of weeds, then submerge them completely in rainwater. If you only have access to mains water, it might be best to allow it to stand for 24 hours to allow the chlorine to disappear. The removal of chlorine makes it easier for microorganisms to multiply. Finally, I pop a lid on and leave the bucket in the garden shed.
    After six weeks of fermenting, the weeds are completely dead and can be strained out of the solution. Beware, this stuff smells vile and will stick around for a day if you get it on you. The dead weeds can now be safely added to your compost to continue breaking down. Use the liquid, which will be rich in nutrients and beneficial microorganisms such as bacteria, fungi, protozoa and nematodes, as a fertiliser by mixing one litre with five litres of water.
    Liquid fertilizer in the form of a “tea” is thought to give plants, especially vegetables and fruit trees, a boost that is quicker than applying the manure, worm castings or compost.
    Although it’s not waste, if you live by the beach, a locally abundant resource for you to create a liquid fertiliser could be seaweed washed up on the shore. But, you must ensure you know the laws about collecting seaweed from beaches in your area. To make the fertiliser, use it in place of or in addition to weeds. As well as calcium, seaweed contains mannitol which is a compound that increases a plant’s ability to absorb nutrients in the soil.
  9. Manure / compost tea or extract - Liquid fertilisers can be made by soaking any nutrient rich material like compost or manure in water. Often these are called ‘teas’, which they are if they have been brewed for a long time like the weed tea above. But according to Sustainable Gardening Australia an extract is a much quicker way of making a nutrient rich fertiliser but without the same level of microorganisms. 
    To make an extract, simply put a shovel full of manure or compost in a 20 litre bucket, mix and leave for a few hours to 3 days. Strain off the liquid and use as fertiliser.
  • 2 answers

Sia ? 10 months ago

  • Nuclear Family.
  • Single Parent Family.
  • Extended Family.
  • Childless Family.

Sakshi Sharma 8 months, 3 weeks ago

•Single parent family •Extended family •Childless family •Nuclear family
  • 5 answers

Chaithanya Kumar 8Th Class 8 months, 3 weeks ago

The kingdom having unicellular eukaryotic organisms are called protista

Kim Damini 10 months, 1 week ago

Ooooooo hava nikal gai

Kim Damini 10 months, 1 week ago

Kahamar gaiiiii

Kim Damini 10 months, 1 week ago

Tera baaaapppp saliiiii ghochu

Munaza Yousuf 10 months, 3 weeks ago

What is soil
  • 2 answers

Sia ? 10 months ago

Monera is a kingdom that contains unicellular organisms with a prokaryotic cell organization, such as bacteria. They are single-celled organisms with no true nuclear membrane. The taxon Monera was first proposed as a phylum by Ernst Haeckel in 1866.

Pankaj Pilania 9 months ago

Monera is a kingdom that contains unicellular organisms with a prokaryotic cell organization, such as bacteria. They are single-celled organisms with no true nuclear membrane. The taxon Monera was first proposed as a phylum by Ernst Haeckel in 1866.
  • 1 answers

Sia ? 10 months ago

The method of arranging organisms into groups on the basis of similarities and differences is called classification. Evolution on the other hand refers to a slow, gradual and continuous process by which the previously existing organisms develop into existing living organisms.

All living things are identified and categorised on the basis of their body design in form and function. Once a certain body design comes into existence, it will shape the effects of all other subsequent design changes, simply because it already exists. So, characteristics that came into existence earlier are likely to be more basic  than characteristics that have come to existence later. This means that the classification of life forms is closely related to their evolution.

  • 1 answers

Mayura Kharwar 11 months, 3 weeks ago

Hello
  • 3 answers

Raju Raju Patel 7 months, 1 week ago

Ok

Ashok Bishnoi 11 months, 1 week ago

Thanks bhai sab

Shazanul Haque Jafar 11 months, 3 weeks ago

Childhood
  • 4 answers

Sia ? 1 year ago

Balancing chemical equation refers to balancing the stoichiometric coefficients on the reactants and products side. This must be done as the chemical equation obeys the law of conservation of mass and momentum.
Hydrogen sulphide gas burns in air to give water and sulphur dioxide can be expressed in terms of equation as
H2​S(g) + O2​(g)→H2​O(l) + SO2​(g)

Ragunath J 10 months ago

H2S + O2 =H2O +S2
Ik

Pushpak Kumar 1 year ago

Thanks bro

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